My recent new, experimental piece is finished…at least I think it finished! Sometimes there’s a clear conclusion to a piece and other times one is left wondering if it is in fact finished, or if missing something, whatever that ‘something’ might be, aesthetically. I’m living with it a while before I print any more. It will be a limited edition of 20.



I decided to call it ‘Workers’ for several reasons:


The idea for this image of an ant carrying an unborn baby came about after reading a book to my youngest daughter called ‘There’s a Hair in my Dirt!’. One page talks about ‘slavemaker ants‘, which I’d not heard of before. They steal eggs from other species of ants and once hatched the youngsters are forced into labour for the colony. This idea fascinated me, and coincided with a recent conversation with a friend about education and the idea that our education system is being deliberately ‘dumbed down’ to produce good workers for society. The rights and wrongs of this theory are not being discussed here, and I expect there are plenty of blogs out there exploring this notion. My personal opinion on this matter is not of importance, and in all honesty I’ve not drawn any conclusion for or against…but I wanted to explore the concept metaphorically as it intrigued me. The other coincidence prior to this piece materialising in my mind, and unrelated to the above conversation, is I’d been watching Pink Floyd’s ‘Another Brick In The Wall’ with my eldest daughter.



Although I have explained the thought process behind this piece, I love hearing how other people interpret what they see. Different eyes and life experiences see things that would have never occured to me:

“Funny how there are systems in nature and in mankind. I like the parallel you’ve drawn (literally!)”

“Body Snatchers” political sci fi thriller — about mind-abduction and conformity.”

and other people see nuture and protection…and others are just freaked out!

What do you see?



Interestingly, after I’d printed this, I had a play with some rat linocuts I made before Christmas. It has sparked an idea for a whole series which (in my opinion) would make a fantastic exhibition. I’m so excited! I can’t wait!  I’ll save that for another blog….!



Baring my soul

It’s a daunting prospect to try out a new direction of work and the art of procrastination can become, in itself, very creative. Since my ‘Drawn to the Light’ moth piece, my mind has awoken to the idea of exploring concepts, political/social issues; incorporating a  narrative into my work. It’s something I’ve deliberately avoided my whole creative career under the pretence that I didn’t know how to express my thoughts, and actively fought against it whilst at art college in the early 1990s. Art theory and group critiques…I once exaggerated my deafness due to a blocked ear (turned out I had the back of an earing lodged inside my ear) to avoid engaging in the group discussions, especially when it came to my work.

But maybe I’ve just never had anything to say until now.

Since having children, my eyes have been opening for nearly 10 years and I’ve become so much more aware of the world around me…and now maybe I’m ready to use my creative voice. I have always been drawn to artists like Hieronymus Bosch, Mark Chagall, Odilion Redon and, more recently discovered, Leonora Carrington; descriptive symbolism and dreamlike or nightmarish imagery. Their work is intriguing and make you wonder what is going on; there are so many narratives and interpretations that can be read into it.  New and strange worlds exist in their art, what was going on in their minds?

I have lots of ideas for future work…I hope people are kind to me as this really is a scary move. There will be failures, frustrations and hopefully a few successes…and my need to produce ‘saleable’ work to earn a living will be a constant struggle. Please, wish me luck!

work in progress


Printmaking Moths and Lightbulbs

I’m back! Can’t believe it’s been way over a year since I wrote a blog. I’m so phenomenally rubbish at this blogging malarky…and Pinterest. People keep telling me that I must blog as it generates interest and a buzz, but when one isn’t is a great place creatively it’s hard to find inspiration to write upbeat things without just drowning in a pool of self pity. And time; time is a big issue.

But here I am, with new work and a confidence boost! Accidentally.moths A3 2d

I began printmaking about a year ago, tentatively re~learning (excuse the wiggle instead of a dash, but my dash button doesn’t work and the wiggle is close enough) techniques I loved 20 years ago. Being a natural 3d artist who used to love drawing, it’s been a rocky road with lots of ups and downs. I naively thought it’d be easy…boy was I wrong, and rightly so! Printmaking is really difficult to succeed in; technically, aesthetically, finding your place in a very popular medium and getting noticed. It’s really really hard, especially with some incredibly talented printmakers out there who blow your mind with their amazing skills and stunning pieces of work. It’s been a steep learning curve and very daunting. I’ve been close to giving up so many times. I stumbled across a wonderful Facebook page called Linocut’s given me insight into techniques, different approaches to printmaking with lino, how people tackle different subject matter and, most importantly, a place to share work, ideas and techniques with some really lovely like~minded and encouraging people. A valuable source of inspiration and motivation, especially when one works from home and can feel quite isolated at times.

This January I had another go, having spent last Autumn making another series of Socktacular Max boys, thus putting printmaking aside. I’d fully intended to make some Skylark Urns stock and whilst waiting for a cotton rope delivery, decided to get the ink, lino and sketch book out. The rope arrived but the urns are still waiting.


I started with moths…thinking moths and poppy seed heads and grasses…people like seed heads and plant based things. Until my fella mentioned lightbulbs and PING! I carved out an old fashioned lightbulb because, you know, their shape is instantly recognisable and pleasin…and nostalgic. I laid them all out, put them through the press and realised I really liked the image. Until this point I’ve been hugely critical of everything I’ve produced in printmaking…finding fault in everything. But I am proud of this new work, for the first time since I began. Obviously nothing is perfect and I can find faults in it, but generally speaking I like it! Oooph, steady on girl!

So much so I’ve made the design into lampshades too!

Through this idea and design, I’ve also realised I’d like to try and create work that voice my thoughts about environmental and social concerns; produce interesting work that sparks debate or a talking point. There’s so much that moths around a lightbulb can say about human nature, as my Etsy listing suggests:

‘The sad folly of moths drawn to light. Transverse Orientation. Does it reflect how our society follows the crowd without question and reason? Confusion. Glimmer of hope. Or a dance of light that goes back since time immemorial…’

And, the huge confidence boost is that I’ve sold some pieces, both on paper and lampshades. To sell some work, when one has struggled immensely with confidence, is a huge deal. It might be insignificant to some, but not to me. It means other people have liked what I’ve made…me, bumbling along with two part time jobs to try and keep my creative ventures alive and having one crisis of confidence after another.

It means I carry on persevering, which is a big thing for me.

But what to do next in printmaking! Oh, the pressure… !!

I might tackle Pinterest tomorrow evening.


Thank you for reading.

new work

I have always been interested in the relationships between humans and animals since my first college days aged 17 when I was given free-rein to make anything I liked  (BTec Nat Dip in General Art and Design, if that course exists any more?). First I made a life-size twig pony from some bush prunings my tutor brought in…they were freshly cut so I put all four legs into buckets of water and it blossomed. I also made a metal springing lamb, plaster foal scratching its head with a hind hoof, a humanised wooden curlew and lastly I cut hundreds of random shapes from sheet metal, painstakingly pop-riveted them together to make a fish man…head of a fish, legs of a man. All these sculptures were at least life size, some bigger. (photos to follow if I can find them)

My two years on that course were amazing because out of everyone in my year group, I was the only one who decided to focus on sculpture, so I didn’t have to share facilities and I only had a vague tutor for a bit of guidance, but mostly they left me to my own devices as I was very focused. When I moved on to my degree course it was a very different experience and although I had a fantastic time, I fought against having to intellectualise my work. I just wanted to make sculptures, without the need to fabricate some tosh about why I’d made it. Some people love all the theory side to art but it wasn’t, and still isn’t for me. I REALLY enjoyed listening to Grayson Perry’s Reith Lectures in 2013, as he voiced all my thoughts about art that I’d never dared mention whilst at college. In retrospect I feel a fine art course was probably not the right direction for me to go in because I started to really struggle with ideas of what to make, like my wings had been clipped. I was made to feel that my desire to ‘only’ make animals or mythical beasts wasn’t good enough and that lack of confidence in my ideas has stayed with me.

Odilon Redon

Mythology, folk tales and fairy tales have always excited me. When I was a child the shelves were full of lovely thick musty volumes of folk and fairy tales with the most exquisite illustrations by Bauer or Rackham to name a couple. One of my favourites was Swedish Folk Tales full of stories of grumpy (and some surprisingly kind) trolls living in dark forest caves or fighting over ownership of mountains, stealing children and goats. Having artist parents also meant that there were many art and reference books to delve into; to admire, inspire or dismiss. Artists and illustrators that have stayed with me since my childhood and teens are John Bauer, Franz Marc, Chagall, Giacometti, Botticceli, Maurice Sendak and Odilon Redon. I’ve always enjoyed the idea of metamorphosis, changelings and anthropomorphism, and recently I’ve been following two pages on Facebook that share weird and wonderful medieval religious drawings of the most extraordinary fantastical beasts! The transformations and connections between humans and animals are endless and have been studied by humans from all parts of the world and throughout history. The references go back to the earliest forms of art…art being the first language. It seems to be an inexhaustable theme that speaks to individuals on a personal, spiritual or religious level.


Which brings me round to my own work again, as I’ve recently begun re-exploring my early love of all these things (happily, without a tutor breathing down my neck!). I experimented with a moth woman a few months ago, and now come back to the idea of making a range of fantastical beasts…starting with spider women. I have found my figurative sock art doll characters have stopped selling….for reasons unknown to me other than perhaps they have reached a natural end. Rather than continuing to make them and feel increasingly disheartened that they are no longer selling, I’m taking it as a sign that it’s time to move on to different work. At the moment I’m still using socks as moving on needs to be done in stages for me, otherwise I’ll get overwhelmed by fear (harking back to those latter college days). I’m still enjoying using socks and feel I’ve got a lot of exciting socky things to explore. Socktacular seems to be on a very organic journey of its own with its beginnings in traditional sock toys, moving onto my own unique sock art dolls and further still into weird and fantastical beasts referencing folk tales, medieval drawings and symbolism in art.


I hope very much you’ll enjoy this new phase and continue to be a part of my Socktacular journey.

Thank you for reading.